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CCN News & Events

Upcoming Event
January 22-23 – Electronic Waste Recycling Event at St. James Cathedral!

This weekend, January 22-23, before all weekend Masses in Cathedral Hall Worldwide, about 40 million tons of electronic waste is generated every year. This is the equivalent of throwing away 800 laptops every second. The St. James Care for Creation committee is partnering with 1 Green Planet to encourage you to bring your old or unused electronics and appliances to Cathedral Hall (907 Columbia St.) before all Masses on January 22-23.

recycle!A list of accepted items can be found at 1greenplanet.com.

If your parish or organization would like to have such an event, contact a local recycler, then work with your parish’s maintenance crew to set up a location where the event can take place. Volunteers will be needed to receive donations before and after Masses.
 
 

Executive Director Position

Earth-Ministry-LogoEarth Ministry/Washington Interfaith Power & Light
Earth Ministry/Washington Interfaith Power & Light is seeking an Executive Director who will embody innovative and collaborative leadership based on a deep commitment to environmental justice and faith-based advocacy in a multifaith context. This full-time position will work with and lead a small but growing, dedicated staff to provide cohesive organizational leadership, management of administration and fundraising, and oversight of programs.

Earth Ministry/WAIPL welcomes all interested candidates who are willing to learn and grow with the organization, especially those under-represented in the faith community and environmental movement. Click here to view the full job description and application instructions.
 
 

The Laudato Si’ platform has been launched!

LaudatoSi-Action-Platform-logoThe Vatican’s seven-year plan to widen the reach of Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical on the environment that launched on November 14th. The pope introduced the initiative in a video May 25, asking the world to join a new global grassroots movement to create a more inclusive, fraternal, peaceful and sustainable world. Coordinated through the Dicastery for Integral Human Development, the platform is “a seven-year journey that will see our communities committed in different ways to becoming totally sustainable, in the spirit of integral ecology,” the pope said. The initiative has seven goals rooted in the encyclical: responding to the cry of the Earth and environmental degradation; responding to the cry of poor and vulnerable people; creating an ecological-sustainable economy; adopting simple lifestyles; supporting ecological education; promoting ecological spirituality; and building community awareness, participation and action.

LaudatoSi-Action-Platform

The Catholic Climate Covenant is coordinating the U.S. involvement with the global platform. Executive director Jose Aguto said dozens of Catholic entities have committed to work toward achieving the initiative’s goals. Its own initiative, called “We’re All Part of God’s Plan(et),” provides resources, ideas and a gathering place for those seeking to integrate Laudato Si’ into daily life. “The covenant wants to make available to interested institutions and individuals access to the people who are working in the respective communities and sectors to implement integral ecology in prayer, word and deed,” he told CNS. “We seek to offer to U.S. faithful and institutions not just a website with resources to implement Laudato Si’ but also hands-on expertise to help accompany them in doing so.”

Executive director Jose Aguto said dozens of Catholic entities have committed to work toward achieving the initiative’s goals. Its own initiative, called “We’re All Part of God’s Plan(et),” provides resources, ideas and a gathering place for those seeking to integrate Laudato Si’ into daily life. “The covenant wants to make available to interested institutions and individuals access to the people who are working in the respective communities and sectors to implement integral ecology in prayer, word and deed,” he told CNS. “We seek to offer to U.S. faithful and institutions not just a website with resources to implement Laudato Si’ but also hands-on expertise to help accompany them in doing so.” The covenant also has distributed dozens of small grants to institutions to help them implement the platform. Funds were made available through a $50,000 gift from Our Lady of Victory Mission Sisters of Huntington, Indiana, and a matching amount from donors. Additional funding is being sought to continue supporting local efforts, Aguto said.

SOURCE: Dennis Sadowski, Catholic News Service, Posted November 15, 2021
INFORMATION:catholicclimatecovenant.org,
laudatosiactionplatform.org

 
 

CCN Past Events
January 20, 2022 – Exciting News for participants of the CCN from the Catholic Climate Covenant

Victory-Noll-Sisters-Small-Grants-Program
IPJC was awarded a $1,000 grant to develop a CCN webpage in an effort to promote the importance of caring for creation. St. John the Baptist Parish of Covington was awarded a $700 grant to establish a pollinator garden next to their produce garden. Congratulations and Blessings on all your endeavors! Catholic-Climate-Covenant

“The Health Impacts of Climate Change in Washington State—And what we can do,” Wednesday, Jan 12, 2022, 7:00pm

HCFA-WA-

Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility (WPSR) is the state affiliate of PSR, a Nobel Peace Prize winning organization working to create a healthy, just, peaceful, and sustainable world. WPSR has mobilized health care providers to be the health care voice on climate action in our state.
WPSR board member, and HCFA-WA Vice President, Chris Covert-Bowlds, MD, (a parishioner of St. Patrick’s-Seattle and CCN member,) will present “The Health Impacts of Climate Change in Washington State—And what we can do,” Wednesday, January 12 at 7pm.

The impacts of climate change are on the rise here in Washington! And make no mistake, climate change is a health emergency. From rising sea levels to summer-long wildfires, Washington state residents are at risk.

With floods, fire, depression, anxiety and despair all around us what can we do? Bring your questions and join Health Care for All—WA’s 2nd Wednesday Speaker Series The Health Impacts of Climate Change in Washington State. (And what we can do.) Wednesday, January 12 at 7pm via zoom. Find the Zoom Link Here!

December 15, 2021 – 7 pm via ZOOM

“COP 26 Through the Eyes of the Church.” Brian Roewe, Environmental Correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter, and Jeff Renner, Emmy-award winning Meteorologist and CCN member, offered their reflections on this historic event. Patrick Barredo of St. James Cathedral and CCN coordinated registration.
Link of the recording here. Passcode: jVa8H**f
Resources for COP 26 event here
SUBMITTED BY: Patrick Barredo

November 1, 2021

Anna Robertson (Director of Youth and Young Adult Mobilization, Catholic Climate Covenant,) shared news of a collaboration between the Catholic Climate Covenant and the Ignatian Solidarity Network in response to COP26 and Election Day in the U.S.: Young people mobilized to pray and fast from sunrise 11/1 to sunrise 11/2. Older persons were asked to join in solidarity with these young participants.
SUBMITTED BY: Anna Robertson

October 30th, 2021

Patrick Barredo, St. James Cathedral, highlighted “Care for God’s Creation” as part of the Faith in Action: Advocacy and Ministries panel of the Cornerstone Catholic Conference sponsored by the Washington State Catholic Conference.
SUBMITTED BY: Patrick Barredo

September 25th, 2021– “Restoring Our Relationship with God’s Creation – From Stewardship to Kinship.”

CCN schedule Sept 2021 flyerAbout 50 people gathered in Our Lady of Guadalupe Church on a crisp September Saturday to pray and reflect on creation, climate change, and what we can do as responsible and caring people. The prayer service was also streamed.

Ann Sager, Our Lady of Guadalupe soloist and pianist was accompanied by David Meza, opening the prayer service with the hymn Make Me a Channel of your Peace based on the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi, Patron of ecology and animals.

Father Kevin Duggan, Pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe, welcomed those gathered and led them in a prayer attributed to Chief Sealth: “We belong to the earth. This we know. The earth does not belong to us. We belong to the earth. This we know. All things are connected like the blood which unites one family. All things are connected. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons and daughters of the earth, We did not weave the web of life. We are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.”

Helen Oesterle, Pastoral Associate of Our Lady of Guadalupe offered the Land Recognition and introduced Cecile Hansen, Chair of the Duwamish Tribe. Cecile, talked about the struggle of the Duwamish Tribe to gain federal recognition. She also spoke of her great great-great-great uncle, Chief Seattle was Roman Catholic and that his faith had meant a great deal to him. Anna Robertson of the Catholic Climate Covenant offered a faith reflection on climate change, its disproportionate impacts on indigenous communities, and the potential of mercy to help us move forward with grief and hope in the face of the ecological crisis and our varying levels of complicity in sustaining it. Her reflection incorporated her own experiences confronting the impacts of climate change in her life alongside those of young adults she has encountered in her work at the Covenant, including those of a Navajo woman whose community and way of life is threatened by severe drought.

Sister Judy Byron, OP, of the Intercommunity Peace and Justice Center spoke of the climate change and the need for justice and equity, especially for the poorest of the poor who contribute the least to the climate crisis and suffer the most because of it. Colorful paper leaves were distributed to the congregation to reflect and write down their personal and community commitments as a call to action.

Patrick Barredo, of St. James Cathedral, introduced the Creation Care Network, speaking of how it was formed to support the development of Laudato Si’ in the archdiocese and of Archbishop Etienne’s commitment to follow through.

Petitions were offered by three students of Our Lady of Guadalupe School.

Eleana Pawl, representing the Tacoma Kateri Circle, introduced our other Patron of ecology – Saint Kateri Tekakwitha – (who is also the patron of displaced people, and native Americans) and closed the prayer service with, “A Prayer for Our Earth” by Pope Francis from Laudato Si’.
The mood of the meeting was sincere and prayerful. The atmosphere was fresh and spontaneous. People commented that they were glad that they came, brought hope to the meeting, and left with a feeling of encouragement. Pictures and Video
SUBMITTED BY: Eleana Pawl

April 22, 2021 – Earth Day Letter to Archbishop Etienne